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Everything you need to know to visit Goblin Valley, Utah

Updated April 2021Everything you need to know to visit Goblin Valley, Utah originally written July 2015

Goblin Valley State Park is seriously one of the coolest places to visit in southern Utah, especially if you’re looking to escape the crowds of more well-known locations such as Zion, Arches National Park, and Bryce Canyon.

Visiting Goblin Valley is like hopping on a rocket and heading for Mars– so much so that the valley of rusted-orange hoodoos was chosen as the backdrop for a scene in the film Galaxy Quest.


Plan a perfect 7 day Southern Utah road trip


Why Visit Goblin Valley?

What’s the main attraction to draw visitors down Highway 24 and away from the main route to other, more well known Utah parks?

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Thousands upon thousands of hoodoos

The state park is made up of thousands of hoodoos (locals nicknamed them goblins because of their goblin-esque appearance). Hoodoos are formed over hundreds of years by rain and wind eroding layers of sediment away to eventually unveil strange, spire-like rock formations. Goblin Valley’s hoodoos are made of Jurassic Period Entrada Sandstone that has weathered the elements for over 170 million years to become the hoodoo stacks they are today.

Of course, you can see hoodoos in Utah’s much more famed national park of Bryce Canyon, but you can get up close and feel like you’ve got them to yourself here at Goblin Valley. Other places in the world you can see hoodoos include Goris, Armenia; Cappadocia, Turkey; and Kandovan, Iran.


Have a bit more time? Check out my two week American Southwest road trip


How To Get To Goblin Valley

From the I-70, take exit 149 onto Highway 24 and drive south for about 24 miles until you see the sign for the Temple Mountain/Goblin Valley turnoff. From the turnoff drive another 12 miles to arrive at Goblin Valley State Park. Goblin Valley can make a great addition to any Utah trip as it is not far from Capitol Reef National Park, Arches National Park, and Canyonlands National park.

When To Visit

Spring and fall are the best seasons to visit Goblin Valley with the most comfortable temperatures for exploring. The summer months of June, July, and August can be hellishly hot (over 100ºF), and winters in this part of Utah can get cold enough for snow.


Heading to neighboring Nevada? Don’t miss 5 off the beaten path things to do in Vegas


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why you should visit goblin valley, goblin valley, goblin valley state park, Utah, hoodoo

What To Pack

Above all, bring plenty of water as Utah’s deserts can get extremely hot. You’ll also want to pack snacks to eat as you meander between hoodoos or for a nice picnic.


Going to New Mexico too? Don’t miss White Sands National Park


Where To Stay

It is possible to camp or to rent a yurt at the state park. You’ll want to reserve in advance here.

Goblin Valley is a bit away from any towns or cities in Utah. The nearest hotels and resorts can be found in Green River (just off the I-70), and Torrey (just outside Capitol Reef National Park).


Make it a road trip? Don’t miss the Grand Canyon North Rim across the border in Arizona


Important Info

  • Entrance fee: $15 per vehicle
  • Camping: Campsites $30 per night, yurt $100 per night
  • Goblin Valley State Park is open year-round
  • Most people will need at least two hours to explore around the park, though you can easily spend an entire day or weekend getting deeper into the park
  • There are bathrooms and picnic tables in the parking lot

Have Any Questions About Visiting Goblin Valley?

Ask in the comments section below!

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6 thoughts on “Everything You Need To Know To Visit Goblin Valley, Utah”

  1. If our family is hoping to just pop in and see the sights without spending a ton of time. How much do we think we should “budget?”

    1. You can easily pop in and take in the sites a short distance from the parking lot, making a quick walk around the hoodoos. I’d say an hour for a quick visit would be enough time to appreciate the landscapes before heading off elsewhere.

  2. I went many years ago as a Boy Scout, late 1960’s. Every Spring Break our troop wouldgo there. Great memories, wonderful park.

    1. Hey Kent,
      Agree, what a great park! I had a friend recommended visiting who grew up in Utah in the 60s/70s.

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